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initially reacted. how did the court system react to this? caller code he was elected as a republican, for what that is worth. he felt he had to defer to the power and authority of the legislature to run pennsylvania elections. the supreme court, when they got that ruling, they sent it right back. they said that voting was a fundamental right and the judge would not be obligated to block the law unless -- sorry, missing a word here -- not disenfranchisement of voters. that was the strict order from the supreme court and he had no choice but to block all law. host: what has been the reaction in pennsylvania? who is going to benefit from this? caller: democrats have been very concerned that this would reduce turnout, especially among the elderly. they held up as a big victory. the republicans are basically trying to make sure that the law takes effect next year, not this year. they are looking to the future. host: as we look forward, do you expect this ruling to go to the supreme court before the election? could there be a change? or is this really what is going to happen? host: -- call
their perspective on the debate and the upcoming elections. we are grateful to all our bridges since this morning. they will take questions from you all. think of what you would like to ask. we will have microphones point around and you can ask questions. we also have the conversation via twitter and we welcome your comments and insights there as well. finally, if you would not mind at silencing your cell phones, it would help us immensely. we are able to gather this morning things to the generosity and underwriting support of united technologies. it is a very diversified company comprised of several well-known brands known to many of you, and they also have utc climate controls and security and utc aerospace, which includes a good rich. utc has been a wonderful partner with "national journal." they also partnered with us on the congressional connection poll to get a sense of what is going on outside of washington and bring that news and information here. and as "national journal" daily readers, it can be informed via utc and the congressional connection poll as well. i want to thank the entire t
is registered to vote. this is the list of by two great teams. two weeks before the election, i know that may seem like a very short time. in politics it is a lifetime. we were interesting digging into what is happening in this space. what trends are occurring? how do people feel about the economy? you are the people who show up to the polls in november? we want to have a discussion about the implications for 2012. this is a follow up to a passage to 70 that was released in november of last year. they wanted to see what had changed and what it would mean for the presidential election. i am pleased to introduce ruy teixeira. after this presentation, he will lead a conversation with our distinguished panel and we look forward to hearing from all of you as well. i encourage you to follow the conversation at twitter. he is a guest scholar at the brookings institute where he has directed politics on democracy. his recent writings include democratic change in the futures of the parties, and the rise of the middle-class. he holds a degree from the university of wisconsin madison. if you are from gre
it your way or the highway. i did that. i tried that in 2005. through the special election -- i said, here is my way or nothing. it failed miserably. i knew from firsthand that that approach does not work. the people of california, they overwhelmingly reelected the next year. the issues were on the ballot because i was inclusive and reaching across the aisle, to democrats and republicans together. no matter what time it is, 100 years ago, 10 years from now, i think the key thing is that you have to encourage -- have the courage to reach across the aisle. i mentioned in my speech political courage is not political suicide. senator mccain is a perfect example. he worked together with teddy kennedy and senator daschle, so many other people. we have seen his political courage. there are not enough at stories on the media done on the people who have political courage. they always want to look for the negative. >> it has become more so -- political suicide than it used to be. part of it is the drawing of district lines of that everybody agrees with you and the only way you can get in trouble is
the elections for some of the candidates. i just think they will be more relevant in the future. as the tea party is not able to help out with the republicans, i think he will see a lot of people in the grass roots level leave the two parties and go to the third party. host: thank you for the call. jill stein just received a hundred $60,000 from the election commission because she is -- $160,000, she is out with a new web ad proclaiming with the green party is all about. [video clip] >> it is an end to unemployment, climate change and an end to corporate role. we are not talking spare change, we need a revolution. that is what we deserve it. what we do not deserve is pandering irresponsible [beep] passing itself off as campaigning. i cannot believe i said that, but that is how i feel. >> i am voting for jill stein. >> we need a green president. vote for jill stein. >> i am voting for jill stein. >> i am jill stein. i approve this message. host: dr. jill stein will be joining us later in the program. from the twitter page -- our question if you are just joining us are listening on c- span ra
named nine things you want to change after the election. >> that is right. we are in a situation where we are facing fiscal disaster. that is not an overdramatic. you can look at these charts. they are easy to find online. do a little search. congressional budget office. treasury. we are facing fiscal disaster. the debt of the united states, the budget, on its current trajectory, will bankrupt the country if we do not do something. >> what is the worst that could happen? >> what almost happened last summer when the idiots, the republican idiots, decided we can have the country default on its debt and that would be fine. if you have ever been a banking reporter, which i have, if there is anything resembling a default on u.s. debt, it is a disaster worldwide. i thought we had learned something from that a year ago. apparently, we have not. the worst thing that happens is a u.s. default on its debt. it would be catastrophic. for no reason, idiotic. it is crazy. >> what is the result? >> every bank in the united states, every major bank, is bankrupt. suddenly, your capital is gone. a lot o
. it is an interesting moment. it is a moment i think may replicate itself in general election debates. i cannot imagine obama will let this question and the tax returns go unremarked. what you see there is a couple of things. romney really pivots. he uses the initial question to swing us over to obama and the democrats and how they are against wealth, supposedly. there is also the reaction from the audience. one of the thing that was striking about this year's round of primary debates was the role of that live audience and how they became the influence and how people are perceiving them. in general election debates, the audiences seem to be much more behave. clearly, the audience played a big part in the whole tone of that clip you showed. >> warren decker, these candidates have lines and talking points. how you come across conversationally rather than sound like somebody who is regurgitating the talking points you have been rehearsing? >> that is probably one of the most difficult things you could ever do. i think it is one of those things that you can try to do it and improve your ability to do it by
attorney decided not to press charges was elected. most of the issues that affect people every day our local issues, but i believe that national organizations put so much emphasis on the top of the ticket they are ignoring vital state, gubernatorial, state, county commissioner, all those down-ballot races, and when you are talking about the military- industrial complex, those are district attorney's charging people, judge-citizens charging people, so speak to how you are educating your constituents to understand down-ballot races matter, and even more so, then the top of the ticket? >> it is also different states. if you complained about extremism in the republican party or the support by minorities of the democratic party, you self-gerrymander the country, counties, and districts. what is transpiring is you can make sure you -- but you are giving up on south carolina. that will not change blew any time soon. >> talking about mississippi, alabama, tennessee, arkansas, a louisiana, and those are considered red states. >> you have to make sure both parties are fighting and we are just no
's to raise -- is this any way to cover an election? it is a really good question. i am sure the profession -- will start -- sparked great conversations and give as good ideas as well. this looks like a fascinating program and we're very proud to hosted. thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> thank you very much. novelette to hand the floor over to james klurfeld stonybrook, a longtime reporter at newsday who will lead our panel -- now i would like to hand over the floor to james klurfeld, a longtime reporter at newsday who will lead our panel her >> thank you. nunnelee introduce the people on the panel. michael howe, the chemical co- founder of the 4th estate project and the architect of the platform who bundled enterprises. the focus on influences him driving media coverage of the election 2012. he has a very interesting presentation to make for us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, a senior editor at the "new yorker." she has been there since 1995. next is anna sale, a political reporter for wnyc-radio. she covered the gop primaries. my condolences. she appears on the brian l
people if they believe we are on the road to greece. if this president is re-elected, that is the road we will be on. i will cut and cap spending and as to a balanced budget. -- get us to a balanced budget. [cheers and applause] the last up to get this economy going is to do this -- championed small businesses. help them grow and keep their taxes down. by the way, the president has a bad idea when it comes to small businesses. this is his idea of taking away the right of the secret ballot for workers when they decide whether or not they won a union. they should have a right to a secret ballot. he wants to take it away. i will protect the rights of workers. [applause] president obama says that he has created 5 million new jobs. what he has not told you is that the economy has not created jobs like it should have. this has been the slowest recovery since the great depression. as a matter of fact, he said we would be at 5.4% of unemployment. instead we are at 8.1%. 9 million jobs at different. that is the difference. when paul and i get to the white house, we will get america back to working
were elected, it would increase taxes by middle-class families by $2,000 a year. we have seen this before. letting banks write their own rules. massive tax cuts for the very wealthy,we know how it ended. it ended in the catastrophe of the middle class. and the great recession of 2008. ladies and gentlemen, i am telling you today, we will not go back to that. [cheers and applause] we cannot go back to that policy. america cannot afford to go back to that policy. the present and i have a different way forward. let me tell you what our plan is. in addition,we have created over 5 million private sector jobs. 5.1 million since we got control. our plan to continue this is made up of four parts. we are going to do it by giving tax breaks to companies that bring factories back to america, not companies that take factories out of america. [applause] we are going to continue to knock down those barriers that exist around the world saying no american goods here. we are going to level the playing field. as i go around the world, i travel -- i have travelled 600,000 miles since i have been
, are debating for the first time before the november election. it is a race to decide who will represent texans in the u.s. senate. i hope that by the end of the night to have a better idea of who you want to vote for. we will follow your comments and commentary on twitter. just use the hashtag #belodebate. we will be able to follow along. look for additional information on twitter. we will have supplemental information on each candidate on what -- where they stand on issues. this is a very different debate. we are throwing out the rules. candidates will face each other answering tough questions. moderating tonight is wfaa's senior political supporter -- reporter, brad watson. joining him is political reporter gromer jeffers. let's turn to dan. >> thank you very much. good evening. >> good to be with you. >> thank you for being with us tonight. >> should be fun. >> we are at it again. >> i would like to start tonight by framing with this race is right now for november with questions for each of you. we start with mr. sadler. you have an uphill battle. raising money has been hard. the democratic
it "forewarned." with your help, paul ryan and i will get elected. [cheers and applause] you'll see enterprises a large and small decide to open their doors and expand. we will see the kind of recovery that america needs and deserves. i have confidence in the american people. i know that created and patriotic people in here. we love this country. there is no other nation on earth like it. we are an exceptional nation. i believe that. when the founders wrote that document known as the declaration of independence, they changed the world with insights that god gave us our rights and not the government. [cheers and applause] these are rights which we have. i love america. my confidence in the future comes from my passion for this country and for the people of this country. do you realize how unusual we are as a people? i do not know how it began, but it is here. it is in our hearts. some years ago when i was serving as governor of my state, the then president of israel came to boston. i happen to have a lunch with him in someone's apartment. someone said to him, "what you think about america's invo
bias has reached unprecedented levels in this election cycles. and later, usa today reporter discusses why the nation's water costs have risen 32% since 2000. "washington journal" is next. host: as we look at the capitol, record high 38% of americans prefer that the same party control the presidency and congress, while a record low, 23%, say it would be better if the president and congress were from different parties. 33% say it doesn't make any difference to them. these findings are based on a gallup poll annual governance survey and are the basis for our discussion for the first 45 minutes of this edition of the "washington journal." good morning. today is saturday, september 29. we want to find out from you about divided government. are you in favor of it? would you prefer to see one party, two parties, three parties? one party versus divided government, your preferences is our topic for the first segment of the program. 202-585-3880 is our number for democrats. republicans can call us at 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. if you're calling outside the u.s., 202-585-3883. we'
waged a campaign to get jim lehrer of pbs who will be posted the first presidential election to ask the question about gun violence. another. you don't hear much debate between the republican candidate mitt romney and president obama -- we will open up the debate and expand the debate as we so often do on "democracy now, "to a third party candidates. we will be in denver, to and we will have third-party candidates responding to the same questions being put to mitt romney and president obama. we will broadcast democracy now.org and on radio as well. you raised the issue of the critical vote as we traveled through pennsylvania. a whole issue of voter suppression and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. presid
this election, what grade would you get yourself and your agency? >> clearly, if you look at where the housing market is in the improvements that have happened, there is no question, i will let others assign letter grades, that is not my job. there are things we have done that worked very well. refinancing is an area where remade changes last year. we have far more people participate than expected. there of the figures we have done it that have fallen short. -- there are other things we have done that have fallen short. we have gone to other programs and made changes. those are now working effectively. the big question is not what letter grades you give, it is whether home owners are better off and whether we are making a difference in their lives. housing prices have been up substantially. 1.3 million families have gotten back above water on their mortgages. we had about $860 billion of new home equity created in the first six months of this year. clearly, are we where we need to be? have we completed a recovery? absolutely not. there is no question that we're moving forward in the housing ma
the may 2010 election when no party won an overall majority in the house of commons. a few days ago, he apologized for breaking his party's election pledge to vote against any rise in university tuition fees. in his speech, he addresses other criticisms from some liberal democrats and outlines his vision for the future up to and beyond the next election in 2015. this is about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. >> this summer, as we cheered our athletes to gold after gold after gold, britain remembered how it feels to win again. but more importantly, we remembered what it takes to win again. whether from jess ennis or mo farah, sarah storey or david weir, the message was the same, we may be the ones on the podium, but behind each of us stands a coach. and behind the coach, a team. and behind the team, the organizers, the volunteers, the supporters. and behind them, a whole city, an entire country, the uk nations united behind one goal. what a contrast from a year ago when england's cities burned in a week of riots. when the images beamed to the world were not of athletes running for th
is at stake this november, and as my husband has said, the only guarantee is that this election will be closer than the last one and it could all come down to just a few battleground states like wisconsin. can decide the whole thing by just a few thousand votes. and while that may sound like a lot, a few thousand votes -- remember that those votes are spread out across an entire state. across hundreds of cities and thousands of wards. when you think about it like that, just a handful of votes in every ward could make all the difference in the world. that could mean just a couple of votes in a neighborhood. just a single vote in an apartment building or in a dorm room. so understand, especially for our students, that one neighbor that one classmate you get to the polls on november 6, that one voter you persuade that one new volunteer you recruit, that could be the one that puts us over the top, so with just a few evenings on a phone bank, with just a few hours knocking on some doors, everybody in this room has a chance to swing an entire ward for barack obama. if we win enough wards we will win
tuition fees. he outlines his future beyond the next election and 2014. this is about 40 minutse. -- minutes. ♪ >> thank you. let me start -- let me start. colleagues, this summer, as we cheered our athletes to gold after gold, britain remembered how it feels to win again. and we remembered what it takes to win again. david weir -- the message was the same. we may be the ones on the podium but behind each of us is a coach, and behind the coach, a team, and beyond the team, the supporters. and behind them, a whole city, an entire country -- the u.k. nations, united behind one goal. what a contrast from a year ago. when england's cities burned in a week of riots and the images were not of athletes running to the finish line, but the mob running at police lines. when the flames climbed not from the olympic torch but a furniture shop in soutland. a 140-year-old business that survived two world wars, razed to the ground. even then -- we saw our country's trouue character when residents came out on the streets to clear up the mess. and this summer, when the reeves furniture shop -- d
me talk about mistakes. i have made mistakes. before i got elected, i said my daughters are available on national tv. that was a pretty big mistake. i am still paying for that one. the difference between i make a mistake, i corrected. i immediately corrected. professor warren, when she made a mistake and misled the voters of massachusetts, it is not that she did not hear the question. this went on for five weeks of the media asking her specifically how they came to know that she was a native american. >> he always ask you professor warren. you think he is trying to cast you as an elitist professor in the eyes of the voters? does that bother you? >> it does not bother me. i worked very hard for this and it does not bother me. >> the boston globe reported she is proud of being a professor. whenever i see my professors from school, i say hello professor so-and-so. she has earned the title. she is a sitting professor. >> you have both earned work as attorneys. you have talked about clients who have represented. you have released a list of those clients that have come on. senator brn, to m
to commit to a leadership vote until the election. you showed no hesitancy -- >> we are going to go on. in the next session, they will sort out their leaders in the next session. we are tentatively going to move on to immigration. >> mr. sadler, stopping illegal immigration, there have been proposals like tripling the size of border patrol or building expensive fences or walls. however, there are 11.5 million illegal residents in our country today. 1.6 million in texas alone. illegal immigrants. do you support a path to citizenship for people here illegally enter yes i do. -- illegally? >> yes, i do. our border, a lot of texans may not know, el paso is the safest city its size in america. our border is a great economic engine, a great cultural factor, it is a diverse cultural region, and we cannot stick our head in the sand any longer. we need to secure our borders. that is our sovereign right. we should do that. that is our right. we have the military to do that, right there in el paso with equipment available to do so. by that, we have surveillance techniques capable that we can uti
are out to buy the election. the reality is is that there are desperate motivations and very different types of people. they are wealthy people and their careers are over and they don't want anything back even if they get a tax break, they don't care. from policies downpour -- from a legal standpoint, how you distinguish from the outset the one guy from the other guy? . there are certain philanthropic goals. there are also real business interests and there is personal interests. as a policy matter, i would not know how to say if you check the box, i am just in it for nothing there for you can give more money to the guy who works for the payday lender. they face huge regulatory barriers. mitt romney my promise that if he is elected, that will not go into effect. >> do you want to dive in? >> 100 years ago, the wall street trusts and elected theodore roosevelt because they thought he would not enforce the antitrust laws. that was ideological and they did not like william jennings bryan because they thought he was a socialist. they said if you want our thinking and the white house, we wan
wanted to say states have rights. but what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and i guess follow their own destiny? winnie's a government interference, i understand you are talking about the federal. but i heard mitt romney say states' rights. is it the right of the state to come into the cities and overthrow the local municipalities? if that is big government, small government. i do not know. i think they should have the right to control their own destiny in their own city. it is on the ballot in november. and i am telling everybody in michigan to a vote it down. we did not need dictatorship. it is a dictator bill. host: thank you. on twitter -- the government to do its job, maintain the general welfare. from debate news, the numbers are and on how many watched on television. more than 67 million watched the first presidential debate. nearly 16 more watched four years ago for about 12 of the 67 who watched president obama square off against mitt romney were between 18-34. fox news channel average 10.4 million viewers. a big improvement over 8.2. cnn clock abo
state and federal elected officials into child care centers. then they can put a pen on the map. i agree we need to be more militant. we used to use those techniques in the 1990 and 1996 reauthorization. we have to be more demanding. i believe this is a campaign in congress not saying or doing much of anything. it is a challenge to get anything constructive said. we have to push more. i would disagree. i think there is interesting activity going on in the state. there is a lot of shallow activity going on in the state and some very serious situations in terms of state funding for child care and early education. in some places where it may look good systemwide, it is precarious in terms of oil will be able to maintain. my final remark, since i was allowed to have the last word, is to the business leaders. i would urge all of the business leaders who have stepped up to support early childhood to also stepped out to the tax-writing committees and point out all of the loopholes we can close and all of the increases that are viable and will provide the revenues we need to provide early childh
in the middle of an election campaign. bill clinton was comparing beijing to baghdad. this was at the time when china was moving from baghdad to paris. [laughter] maybe i am overstating the case, but that is what is happening. this was a dramatic shift in china and the u.s. government paid absolutely no attention to it. it had no impact on the policies of the clinton the administration when it took office. since i was the american ambassador, this confronted me with a problem of american government and had one view of china but china was already moving in a different direction and that created some contradictions in trying to carry out my instructions. this time, you have some echoes of that. clearly the bo xilai affair has shown that the political system is not that different for others. leaders have their own ambitions. some succeed and some come crashing down, as in the case of bo xilai. so we should not assume political jockeying is not taking place and this could explain why the announcement of the party congress was delayed. no longer do you have an all- powerful leader who can resolve di
on the election. >> the issue for me has to do with women's rights. and rights for all women, not just wealthy women. and the supreme court will go a long way to make sure that those are secured for generations to come. >> i was interested in the economy. >> the biggest issue for me is getting a job after i'm done for school. i pay $55,000 a year to come here. i need a job to pay for that. >> it's important to me to make sure i am able to get a job. >> there are many issues we need to focus on. >> video-based social media service similar to a tweet. last night's debate is the most tweeted event in history, topping this year's republican and democratic conventions. a look at last night's debate. the debate was held at the university of denver. it was spoke focusing on domestic policy issues. we want to show you reaction from the candidates during the debate. it's about an hour and a half. >> i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president barack obama, the democratic nominee and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate and the
view. pow mackoy romney says boo who get over it. and finally, the media want obama to be re-elected. the left will do anything and everything to keep the left wing socialist. those are some of our facebook comments this morning. if you'd like to make a comment, continue the conversation on this topic. go to facebook.com/cspan. here's "the wall street journal" this morning. swing state, a tough sell for romney. obama has a slim lead in north carolina, nevada, wider margin in new hampshire. if you come down here, we can see that currently, according to "the wall street journal"/nbc poll, barack obama leads in nevada 49% to 47%. he leads in new hampshire 51% to 44%, and in north carolina 48% to 46%. however, two of the three states, north carolina and nevada, both think that mitt romney is stronger on the economy. so that's one set of polls. now, we've got this other set of polls we want to show you very quickly, and this is from rasmussen, and he does -- scott rasmussen's group, rasmussenreports.com, they do a daily tracking poll. for a long time now, they've been showing this race as
on our web site to find even more information about candidates and the issues this election season. we have seen our society and government faced growing challenges. we hope that our sponsorship of this senate debate will help you gain a better understanding on how each of these candidates would represent us and go for our nation. join us in watching the debate and in thinking about the future. join us on tuesday, november 6. the format will allow for each candidate to make an opening statement and respond to questions from >> the format will allow for each candidate to make an opening statement, to respond to questions from a panel and work -- a panel of reporters, and a closing statement. include robert kennedy. opening statement. >> thank you for this opportunity. over the last year, i've traveled this great state. for so many, it has been harder and harder just to get by. what has changed has not been our work ethic, it has been the rules. today in washington, powerful rules. of middle-class families. that is why wisconsin needs a senator who will. i've spent my time in washington
are running to be not just a senator from nebraska, but a u.s. senator. if elected, how would you balance the economic interests of agriculture with those of the nation as a hole. should congress require the use of 15 billion gals a year for ethanol when critics say that raises food prices for everyone? >> the nation he is and agriculture is align. we have a surplus. the interests of agriculture and the united states are aligned. i am appalled that neither governor romney or president obama is talking about agriculture in this campaign. it is the foundation of the u.s. economy. i fought for ethanol since i was governor. it has been a great success. it has lowered the price of fuel, improved the quality of economy. it has created tens of thousands of jobs. it is a great example of bipartisan efforts. there is a new company with 100 yards. -- with 100 jobs. the governor and senator worked together with the champion better of commerce and brought the jobs here. this isn't a threat to our economy. the interests of agriculture and the united states of america are completely aligned. there is n
-able. this is right in front of us. we can do this. you know, this election is not just about these material issues. this election is about the fiber of our society. this election is about the kind of people we are going to be, the kind of country we're going to have. this country is an idea. that's something we can never forget. it is not new hampshire to california or florida to wisconsin. it is not just a nation with a flag. it is the only nation founded on an idea. that idea is very precious, but that idea can slip away from us if each generation doesn't defend the idea. the idea is very precious. the declaration of independence said it better than anybody can say it. our rights come from nature and nature's god, not from government. the minute we forget that idea, the minute we fore-- forget our country. our founders put that on the uniform so we can live in peace and freedom. and we thank them for what they have done to give us this country. [cheers and applause] that's why we have to win. that's why we're going to win. look. winston churchill said it best. "the americans can be counted upon
for political purposes, perhaps for election purposes. and i'm not sure that plighting our intentions to put out difficult nit time lines was and would be the smartest answer. you've got people over there that want to do us harm. you've got the taliban there that think about human bppings differently than we do. we know about the atrosstiss to women. and so we haven't done a good enough job in educating our country about the bad guys that exist. that we need to meet them offshore before they come on shore. it's only been ten years since 9/11. >> first of all, i applaud the president for having brought our sons and daughters home from iraq. a war we should have never been in and a war i voted against. i have been an advocate in changing our policy in afghanistan to count terrorism. we're trying to prop up a government in afghanistan. couldn't terrorism requires far less troops and focuses at striking against al qaeda sweledl as well as any taliban insurjents we might need for the purpose of our fight. i believe that the draw down in afghanistan is well positioned. i'm actually an advocate of some
in this election. and that's why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got -- got an extreme makeover. [applause] but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top-down economics that we've seen before. he thinks that if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that yes, skewed toward the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be solved. jobs and prosperity will rain down from the sky. the deficits will magically disappear. we will live happily ever after. [laughter] even though he's been proposing this plan for months now, he's had a little trouble explaining just how it would work without blowing a hole in the deficit or making middle class families pick up the tab. the other night he ruled out asking millionaires and billionaires to pay even a dime more in taxes. he said there's no way that he would close the loophole that gives big oil companies billions each year in corporate welfare. ending tax breaks for corporations that move jobs and profits o
for the next 24 hours for the remainder of the election. >> are we entering an era in which the rhetorical measurement is if you lose as opposed to if you win. would you say that is the circumstance to which candidates -- winning is nice, but not losing is the thing. >> that could be what they are looking at. the risk factor is so high, but not losing is sometimes more important. this year for obama in particular. >> the fact that the headline seems to be -- the gaff ise of the headline. >> -- the gaffe is the headline. >> i am wondering what would be the most important thing for me to look at when i am watching the debate. what would be the number 1. the debate is open. what should i be looking at? >> my perspective would be the thing you want to look for is, democratic leadership. how does this person perform democratic leadership? as americans we have conflicting expectations that the president be democratic, or ordinary, someone who acts like we would, someone who will subordinate themselves to the public will and be a public servant. someone who was democratic and with the people, but
this is a very important moment for our country. we have achieved extraordinary prosperity. and in this election, america has to make an important choice. will we use our prosperity to enrich not just the few, but all of our families? i believe we have to make the right and responsible choices. if i'm entrusted with the presidency, here are the choices that i will make. i will balance the budget every year. i will pay down the national debt. i will put medicare and social security in a lockbox and protect them. and i will cut taxes for middle- class families. i believe it's important to resist the temptation to squander our surplus. if we make the right choices, we can have a prosperity that endures and enriches all of our people. if i'm entrusted with the presidency, i will help parents and strengthen families because, you know, if we have prosperity that grows and grows, we still won't be successful unless we strengthen families by, for example, ensuring that children can always go to schools that are safe. by giving parents the tools to protect their children against cultural pollution. i wil
about our work in great ways. i think that when you look back on this election, we will say, this was the year of the fact checker. this was the year that fact checking really hit critical mass. let me get to predictions -- i think this will come up in the debate. not because mitt romney will bring it up, but because he will be asked about it by one of the moderators. but the romney campaign has shown no signs of pulling back on this. i got a mail -- i live in virginia -- i got a mail at my house for my daughter, who registered to vote a week ago. it repeated all the lines in the welfare at. i think the romney campaign has found a message that it once to -- wants to keep hitting. i think that will come up in the debate. we will hear from obama. initially, we saw this in the polls, this has resonated, their traditional scare seniors about medicare tactics. that has been working really well. so i think obama will bring that up. one thing we will hear is the phrase that romney would end medicare's guarantee, which is a phrase the democrats have liked to use recently. we have ra
has already downgraded the united states. if we do not make any real progress, right after an election and everybody is trying to deny, if they cannot make progress, then the problems are still toxic. you do not need causing a recession as a threat to force us to move. we should get past the fiscal closed. and then get to the fundamentals in this grand bargain that would forever get rid of the fiscal cliff. that is the best way to go. >> and diane? >> the way we got here to the fiscal cliff was a bunch of cans getting kicked down the road. if you look at the cbo analysis of the fiscal of, you realize the scary part is the can that happen to be in the road in front of us right now. there is a good part of the cliff, and that is the part that stretches on through the 10-year budget window. that is something we call the baseline and the cbo analyzes about. at the cdo talks about how going over the fiscal closed at the end of this year would likely bring us back into recession. i think that is very important to hold onto because we have been in the habit of kicking the can down the road. i
grandmother died three days before i was elected president. she was independent. she worked her way up. she only had a high school allocation. -- education. she ended up being the vice- president of a local bank. she ended up living along by choice. -- living alone by choice. the reasonshe could be independent because of social security and medicare. she worked all of her life, and understood there was basic floor under which she could not go. the name "entitlements" implies some sense of dependency on the part of these people. these are people who have worked hard. like my grandmother and there are millions of people out there who are counting on us. my approach is to say how do we strengthen the system of the long term? in medicare, what we did was we said we are going to have to bring down the costs if we are going to deal with our long-term deficits. to do that, let's look at where some of the money is going. $716 billion we were able to save by no longer overpaying insurance companies and making sure we are not overpaying providers and using that money we were able to lower prescriptio
and gentlemen, it is my pleasure at the outset to express my congratulations to mr. jeremich on his election to the presidency of the general assembly. i should also like to commend another leader for his leadership at last year's session. i should like to express our sincere gratitude and k-meciation to mr. ban oon secretary-general, of -- ban ki-moon, secretary general of the united nations, for his starters, objectives, and purposes. mr. president -- three years ago, a despot who rolled my country for 43 years -- ruled my country for 43 years, he stood on this very platform and torpor a copy of the charter of -- tore a copy of the united nations, saying he did not recognize the authority of the document. today, i am standing on the same platform, asserting my country's support of the charter of the united nations and our respect for it. i stand before you today, before the entire world, to apologize for all the harm, all the crime, committed by that despot against so many innocents. to apologize for the extortion and terrorism he meted on so many states. i should like to stress that the l
is that this election will be closer than the last one and it could all come down to just a few battleground states like wisconsin. can decide the whole thing by just a few thousand votes. and while that may sound like a lot, a few thousand votes -- remember that those votes are spread out across an entire state. across hundreds of cities and thousands of wards. when you think about it like that, just a handful of votes in every ward could make all the difference in the world. that could mean just a couple of votes in a neighborhood. just a single vote in an apartment building or in a dorm room. so understand, especially for our students, that one neighbor that one classmate you get to the polls on november 6, that one voter you persuade that one new volunteer you recruit, that could be the one that puts us over the top, so with just a few evenings on a phone bank, with just a few hours knocking on some doors, everybody in this room has a chance to swing an entire ward for barack obama. if we win enough wards we will win this state. and if we win this state we'll be well on our way to putting barack oba
look at my record in nebraska. you're not elected chairman of a major committee, you are not elected leadership if you are a partisan person. we have worked across the aisle on a number of issues in this state in taking on these really tough policy issues and building consensus. that is how you get things done. i would hope to do that in washington. before, i have mentioned a couple times names, senator manchin and senator warner, who have expressed interest in making spending cuts and reforming the health care act, so those are individuals i would look to in order to work with on issues. i believe there is bipartisan support on a number of issues. the corporate tax rate -- there is bipartisan support for that. there is bipartisan support looking at reforming the tax code, repealing the death tax, which we have done in nebraska. looking at repealing the alternative minimum tax. that was set up and as a parallel tax that was trying to capture income from wealthier individuals. it was not indexed for inflation. that is dipping down and hurting the middle class so that one in five peopl
walter mondale. tonight's debate marks the third consecutive presidential election in which the league is presenting the candidates for the nation's highest office in face-to-face debate. our panelists are james wieghart, national political correspondent for scripps- howard news service, diane sawyer, correspondent for the cbs program "60 minutes,'' and fred barnes, national political correspondent for the baltimore sun. barbara walters of abc news, who is appearing in her fourth presidential debate, is our moderator. barbara. >> thank you, dorothy. a few words as we begin tonight's debate about the format. the position of the candidates -- that is, who answers questions first and who gives the last statement -- was determined by a toss of a coin between the two candidates. mr. mondale won, and that means that he chose to give the final closing statement. it means, too, that the president will answer the first question first. i hope that's clear. if it isn't, it will become clear as the debate goes on. further, the candidates will be addressed as they each wanted and will, therefore, b
that the voters should take from that that's relevant to this election? >> they ought to factor in it when they go to the voting booth. >> in what way? >> i think people need to be held responsible for the actions they take in life. i think that -- well, i think that's part of the need for a cultural change. we need to say we each need to be responsible for what we do. people in the highest office of the land must be responsible for decisions they make in life. and that's the way i've conducted myself as governor of texas and that's the way i'll conduct myself as president of the united states, should i be fortunate enough to earn your vote. >> are you saying all this is irrelevant, vice president gore? >> no. i think the american people should take into account who we are as individuals, what our experience is, what our positions are on the issues and proposals are. i'm asking you to see me for who i really am. i'm offering you my own vision, my own experience, my own proposals. and incidentally, one of them is this. this current campaign financing system has not reflected credit on anybody in ei
all would be supported. he supported the birth of a new democracy as libyans held elections and built new institutions. he began to move a forward after decades of dictatorship. chris stevens love his work. he took pride in the country he served anti sought dignity in the people that he met. two weeks ago, he traveled to establish a new cultural center and build a hospital. that is when the compound came under attack, along with three of his colleagues, chris was killed in the city that he helped to save. he was 52 years old. a study this story because chris stevens embody the best of america. like his fellow foreign service officers, he built divisions -- he built bridges across oceans. he is deeply invested in the vision that the united nations represents. he acted with humility, but he also stood up for a set of principles. a belief that individuals should be free to determine their own destiny and live with liberty, and dignity, justice, and opportunities. the attacks on the civilians in benghazi were attacks on america. we are grateful for the assistance we receive from the libya
from nebraska, but a u.s. senator. if elected, how will you balance economic interests of agriculture with those of the nation, and should confiscate any to require use of up to 15 billion gallons a year of ethanol, taking 40% of the nation's corn crop, when critics say that raises food prices for everyone? >> the critics are wrong. the nation plus interests in agriculture are aligned. it is one of our most competitive industry. the interest of agriculture and the united states are aligned and i am appalled that neither governor romney or president obama is talking about agriculture in this campaign. it is an important part, a foundation of the u.s. economy. ethanol, i fought for ethanol since i was governor. it has lowered the price of fuel. it is created tens of thousands of jobs. i was in blair last week, a great example of bipartisan effort. there is a new dcompany with a hundred jobs. is is not a failure. this is not a threat to our economy. the interest of agriculture and the united states are completely in alignment. there's no need to choose. >> senator fischer? >> i grew up i
you, mr. president. thank you for tuning in. this is an important election, and i am concerned about america. i am concerned about the direction of america has been taking. i know this is bigger than any election about the two of us as individuals. is bigger than our respective parties. it is about what kind of america do you want to have for yourself and your children. there are two different paths we are speaking about this evening and over the course of the next month we will have two other debates. we will talk about the two paths. they lead in different directions. it is not just looking at our words, you can look at the record. there is no question if the president were to be reelected, he would continue to see a middle-class squeeze it. we have had 43 straight months with unemployment over 8%. i will help create 12 million new jobs in this country with rising incomes. if the president is reelected, obamacare will be fully installed. in my view that will make a whole different way of life for people who counted on the insurance plan the had in the past. he was the health premiu
are listening. caller: i think this is a game changer. i think he will be elected and he will be the greatest president in the history of the country. i could not even sleep last night. i thought it was a total home run. i am so fired up. everybody at the barbecue was so excited. i do not have the words to say -- i will turn it on like anything you have ever seen for the next five weeks. he will be the best president in history. host:next is ann, a president obama supporter. caller: good morning. i think exactly the opposite. i think mitt romney looked almost manic and his appearance. i have never seen him flailing his arms around. he told so many lies. he completely turned around all of the things he has been running on the for the past 18 months. he even through the tax policy away. he just changed everything. it was really unbelievable. i think many people looked at him being more aggressive. that is what they were rewarding. once people started paying attention to exactly why he said, they would see that his -- that he told so many lies and distorted what he was trying to say. i think the
in three years. as a result, businesses are waiting to see and what happens with the election and waiting to see what their lives will look like, the tax rates, regulation, etc. they are upheld by the health care expense, so they're waiting until after the election to decide if they will hire new workers and put new money to work. we really aren't in standstill mode in the u.s. economy right now. caller: another story -- i want to ask you about using the word "brace." guest: i think the president has had an antagonistic relationship with business. i think that's pretty clear. over the last several months he did lose the independent vote and the business vote. if the numbers show that he is actually winning, i could understand that now they are disappointed, because they were counting on some competition. but i don't think you can really tell right now. it's hard to know how accurate the polls are. in some cases i think the media is pulling democrats and other cases people don't necessarily tell you what they will do. it's likely we will see a very close race. it could go either way. i am
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